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Acupuncture

How does Acupuncture work?
The ancient Chinese described an essential life-force or vital-energy called Qi, which is present throughout the cosmos and in evety living creature. This Qi can and must constantly move and change. Qi enters the body mainly in food and with the breath, after which it is extracted and circulated throughout the body along specific pathways call meridians. These meridians link the vital organs inside with the skin and muscles on the body surface, as well as form the channels of communication between the vital organs and accessoty organs of the body.

As long as Qi flows freely throughout the meridians, health is maintained. Disruption of the flow of Qi through the meridians results in pain and illness. The use of acupuncture can correct such disruption by adjusting the flow of energy, remove blockages, shunting Qi to those areas where it is deficient and draining it from areas where it is excess.

Recent western scientific experimentation confirmed the location of acupuncture meridians through the use of electromagnetic techniques. The points used in acupuncture have been observed to have a variety of unique bioelectric properties. The stimulation of these points was shown to cause definite physiological reactions in brain activity, blood chemistry, endocrine functions, blood pressure, heart rate and immune system response.

What is Traditional Chinese Medicine?
Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a holistic medical system which combines the use of Acupuncture, Chinese herbs" nutrition, Tuina massage, and movement exercises (known as T ai Chi or Qi Gong) to bring the body into balance.

Whereas Western medicine looks closely at a symptom and tries to find an underlying cause, Traditional Chinese Medicine looks at the body as a whole. Each symptom is looked at in relationship to all other presenting symptoms. The goal of the TCM practitioner is to assess the entire constitution of the patient -- considering both physiological and psychological aspects.

The practitioner first observes the general characteristics of the patient, then tries to discern a relationship between symptoms in order to establish what is called a "Pattern of disharmony". Treatment is aimed at restoring harmony and bringing the body into balance.

TCM not only treats the physical body, but also treats the mind and spirit, helping to bring the whole body to a higher level of function and improved state of balance ¬what Western medicine calls improved metabolism, strengthening auto immune system and organ function, and homeostasis.